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Academic Grading System in Canada

Grading System
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Academic grading system in Canada varies from province to province. The following are commonly used conversions from percentage grades to letter grades, nonetheless this not necessarily meaningful as there is no uniform scheme for assigning percentage grades. The present argumentative essay comprises of the benefits and the effects of academic grading system in Canada.

Academic grading in General
In Alberta, academic grading follows a scale of letter grades from A until D and sentences to describe the level of performance to explain the curricular tasks that is expected from them and percentages that are typically reserved for high school, university and college. These percentages differ from faculty to faculty in universities as well as among different universities. In many institutions that is post secondary, percentages is mainly a suggestion and is not a hard grading system and in some personal classes there is large deviations from the normal. Letter grades are not used as part of the francophone schools, only percentages are used in such schools. In kindergarten schools as well, letter grading is used from numbers 1 till 4, with 4 being best, 3 being good and 2 and 1 being acceptable and poor respectively (Louis et al. 2016).

Noting down the letter grades on a report card and scribbling notes about the performance of students, behavior and attendance is a thing that has happened in the past. These days report cards are of different electronic variety and some of the other software involves important elements that is designed to help teachers. With standards based grading and allowing them to focus on proper energy on what they are best at doing such as inspiring, creating and helping students to perform better in the peat as well as in the future (Abdallah et al. 2015).

Standard grading system
Standard grading system in Canada has many effects and they focus specifically on providing benefits to the students. They specifically contain the grading system what every child needs to work so that he or she meets the standard of learning. They also allow the teacher to understand in an effective manner, the level that every student has reached and what needs to be done for their improvement. It gives specific feedback to every students and makes it very easy for parents to understand that the grades of the child needs improvement with the help of the areas specified for improvement (González et al. 2016).

Standards based grade book
The grade book is a kind of software that is used to record the grades of students and offers teachers with many options other than manual grade reporting and excel entries. The web-based system is formed for a approaching, pure implementation of important based grading. Other products allow users to work on both ability and other traditional grading helping in both worlds during the transition period and in the future as well.

Advantages and disadvantages of grading system in Canada
As with most of the things in life, there are some benefits and effects thus before investing in standards based grade book software for their schools there are few things one should consider. The best part about the software is that it helps teachers time by providing a clear view of every student level of performance on every standard. Parents, teachers and students can track their progress the entire year as students become very proficient. On the other hand, there are associated dangers with the system of grading on software, as the teachers can have access to software in every standard. It is not possible that parents will not like six page report card and moreover sometimes computerized programs automatically level the different entries in the grade book to measure the final book. Compared to other traditional grading every grade is recorded on the standards based grade book is tied to a learning goal  and crucial element is that students learn instead of assignment averages (Greenberg et al. 2015).

In many institutions that is post secondary, percentages is mainly a suggestion and is not a hard grading system and in some personal classes there is large deviations from the normal. Letter grades are not used as part of the francophone schools, only percentages are used in such schools. In kindergarten schools as well, letter grading is used from numbers 1 till 4, with 4 being best, 3 being good and 2 and 1 being acceptable and poor respectively. Noting down the letter grades on a report card and scribing notes about the performance of students, behavior and attendance is a thing that has happened in the past. These days’ report cards are of different electronic variety and some of the other software involves important elements that are designed to help teachers (Greenberg et al. 2015).

References
Abdallah, F.W., Morgan, P.J., Cil, T., Escallon, J.M., Semple, J.L. and Chan, V.W., 2015. Comparing the DN4 tool with the IASP grading system for chronic neuropathic pain screening after breast tumor resection with and without paravertebral blocks: a prospective 6-month validation study. Pain156(4), pp.740-749.

González, S.A., Castiblanco, M.A., Arias-Gómez, L.F., Martinez-Ospina, A., Cohen, D.D., Holguin, G.A., Almanza, A., Lemos, D.M.C., Correa-Bautista, J.E., Escobar, I.D. and García, J., 2016. Results from Colombia’s 2016 report card on physical activity for children and youth. Journal of physical activity and health, 13(11 Suppl 2), pp.S129-S136.

Greenberg, J.K., Yarbrough, C.K., Radmanesh, A., Godzik, J., Yu, M., Jeffe, D.B., Smyth, M.D., Park, T.S., Piccirillo, J.F. and Limbrick, D.D., 2015. The Chiari Severity Index: a preoperative grading system for Chiari malformation type 1. Neurosurgery, 76(3), pp.279-285.

Greenberg, J.K., Yarbrough, C.K., Radmanesh, A., Godzik, J., Yu, M., Jeffe, D.B., Smyth, M.D., Park, T.S., Piccirillo, J.F. and Limbrick, D.D., 2015. The Chiari Severity Index: a preoperative grading system for Chiari malformation type 1. Neurosurgery, 76(3), pp.279-285.

Louis, D.N., Perry, A., Reifenberger, G., Von Deimling, A., Figarella-Branger, D., Cavenee, W.K., Ohgaki, H., Wiestler, O.D., Kleihues, P. and Ellison, D.W., 2016. The 2016 World Health Organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system: a summary. Acta neuropathologica, 131(6), pp.803-820.